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Emily Rodgers

Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning

Program Area: Reading and Literacy in Early and Middle Childhood Education

(614) 292-9288
rodgers.42@osu.edu

Biography

Emily Rodgers is an associate professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning. She is affiliated with the Reading and Literacy in Early and Middle Childhood Area of Study where she mentors graduate students and teaches courses related to early literacy. Rodgers studies educational policies and practices that influence the reading development of young students who are having difficulty learning to read and write; lines of inquiry that have their roots in her early career as a classroom teacher, a reading specialist and a special education teacher. Her research examines the nature of effective scaffolding in early literacy instruction, effective coaching of teachers, and challenges of reforming, implementing, scaling and sustaining effective literacy intervention practices. She was the co-investigator for the successful five-year $45 million scale-up grant to scale Reading Recovery in the U.S.; a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation, and is currently the principal investigator for a $3 million i3 grant to develop an effective literacy instruction format for young students who have IEPs for beginning literacy instruction. 

Education

  • PhD, Language Arts, Children's Literature and Reading, The Ohio State University, 1998
  • MA, Language Arts, Children's Literature and Reading, The Ohio State University, 1995
  • Additional Qualifications in Reading, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, 1989
  • BS, Special Education, Memorial University (St. John's, Newfoundland), 1988
  • BA, Education, Memorial University (St. John's, Newfoundland),1985

Research Interests

Research Summary

The lines of inquiry that I am pursuing as an associate professor at Ohio State have their roots in my early professional career. As a teacher, I began to investigate questions related to struggling readers. I knew they could make progress, but could they catch up with their peers? How could I provide the instruction that would lead to accelerated progress?" These questions led me to my Ph.D. program and the two intersecting lines of inquiry that have been the focus of my academic work: scaffolding literacy learning for children having great difficulty learning to read and the professional development of literacy teachers. From this background of teaching experiences and early research, I developed several research questions related to identifying and describing critical features of expert literacy instruction. Specifically, I have investigated the role of language in scaffolding (or lifting) the literacy learning of children having difficulty learning to read. The following questions have guided this inquiry:

  1. What is the nature of teaching interactions, as characterized by the patterns of talk, between teacher and child in a one-to-one tutoring setting?
  2. How do patterns of interactions during critical learning moments further the child's literacy acquisition?

My research has led me to realize that in order to make a difference for struggling readers, we need to intervene as early as first grade, as soon as it becomes apparent that the child's trajectory of progress is off course. My review of the literature also led me to conclude that in order to catch up with their peers, children having great difficulty learning to read and write need to be taught by specially trained literacy teachers in a one-to-one setting. One of my major accomplishments thus far from this line of inquiry has been to develop a way to categorize teacher talk in terms of its function (to demonstrate, to direct, to question, to praise, to tell, or to confirm). I developed this tool as a result of my dissertation research for which I received a national award for outstanding student research from the National Reading Conference. We can not investigate effective instruction without inquiring into teachers' thinking and learning and this understanding leads to my second line of inquiry: the nature of effective professional development. My research in this area has been guided by the following research questions:

  1. How do teachers learn to provide scaffolds for student learning?
  2. What support systems can lead to positive shifts in teaching?

I have conducted 16 case studies on effective literacy tutoring. These case studies involve eight Reading Recovery teachers; five in Ohio and three in Auckland, New Zealand and 16 first grade students. My goal is to advance a theory of scaffolding literacy learning based on these case studies that can be tested in an empirically designed study.

Experience

The main goal of my professional activities has been to make a difference in the literacy lives of young children having great difficulty learning to read and write. Why is this important? For one, Juel (1988) showed with her longitudinal research that the children in her study who fell behind in first grade had about an 88% chance of still being behind in fourth grade, while average students had a 12 percent chance of struggling with reading later on. Through my research, publications, teaching, consultation, conference presentations, I have been working with teachers or literacy coaches (called teacher leaders) who all work directly with students, to make a difference to teaching and learning.

Honors

National Reading Conference's Outstanding Student Research Award, 1999
Reading Recovery Trainer Fellowship
Amount: $7,500 NZD
June 2002 - August 2002
This award was given to carry out research, "Scaffolding Reading Performance in Reading Recovery Lessons", in Auckland, New Zealand for which I was the principal investigator

Grants

  • I3 Development Grant
    Improving Literacy Outcomes for Beginning Readers with Disabilities. Principal Investigator: Emily Rodgers Co- Investigator: Jerome D’Agostino January 2015 – December 2018 Sponsor: Investing in Innovation Fund Office of Innovation and Improvement U.S. Department of Education Amount: $3.5 M ($ 2,995,039 from USDE and a private sector match of $499,255)

  • I3 Scale Up Grant
    Reading Recovery: Scaling Up What Works Project Director: Jerome D’Agostino Co-Director: Emily Rodgers October 2010 – September 2015 Sponsor: Investing in Innovation Fund Office of Innovation and Improvement U.S. Department of Education 
    Amount: $54.2M ($46.1M from USDE and a private sector $9.1M)

  • Excellence in Engagement Grant
    Preparing Expert Literacy Volunteers in Schools July 2006- July 2008 Co-Investigator Principal Investigator: Adrian Rodgers Sponsor: OSU University Outreach and Engagement Amount: $81,680

  • Teacher Quality Research Grant
     
    Can Literacy Professional Development be Improved with Web-based Collaborative Learning Tools: A Randomized Field Trial July 2004 – August 2008 Key Personnel Principal Investigator: Anthony Bryk Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Dept. of Education Amount: $451,567 

    Learning how to scaffold children’s reading: Case studies from effective literacy tutors. Principal Investigator 2001 Sponsor: Columbus Foundation Amount: $3,000

    A Case Study of Educational Reform Principal Investigator 1999-2000 Sponsor:The Reading Recovery Council of North America Amount:$5000 

Selected Publications

PeerrevieweJournal Articles

  • Rodgers, E.M. (2016). Scaling and sustaining an intervention: The case of Reading Recovery. Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 21,10-28 
  • Rodgers, E.M., D'Agostino, J.V., Harmey, S.J., Kelly, R.H. & Brownfield, K. (2016). Examining the nature of scaffolding in an early literacy intervention.  Reading Research Quarterly, 51(2), 345-360
  • D’Agostino, J. V., Rodgers, E., Harmey, S., & Brownfield, K. (2015). Introducing an iPad app into literacy instruction for struggling readers: Teacher perceptions and student outcomes. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, doi: 10.1177/1468798415616853
  • Hough , H., Kerbow, D., Bryk, A., Pinnell, G., Rodgers, E., Dexter, E., Hung, C., Scharer, P., Fountas, & Fountas,I. (2012). Assessing teacher practice and development: The case of comprehensive literacy instruction. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 23, 1-34.
  • Briggs, C., Rodgers, E. & Simpson, A. (2011). A review of the U.S. text level assessment process. Journal of Reading Recovery, 10, 45-­48.
  • Rodgers, E. (2005). Interactions that scaffold reading performance. Journal of Literacy Research, 36, 501-­532.
  • Rodgers, E., Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. (2003). Closing the achievement gap in Ohio with Reading Recovery. Journal of Reading Recovery, 3(1), 65-­74.
  • Rodgers, E., Fullerton, S. & DeFord, D. (2001). What does it take to reform instructional practices? In J.V. Hoffman, D.L. Schallert, C.M. Fairbanks, J. Worthy & B. Maloch (Eds.), Fiftieth yearbook of the National Reading Conference (pp. 519 – 531). Chicago, IL: National Reading Conference.
  • Rodgers, E. (2000). Collaborative Inquiry in Reading Recovery, or "Why Sit in a Circle?"  Running Record, 13(2), 6-­7.
  • Rodgers, E., (2000). Language Matters: When is a scaffold really a scaffold? In T. Shanahan & F. Rodriguez-­Brown (Eds.), Forty-­ninth yearbook of the National Reading Conference, (pp.78-­90). Chicago, IL: National Reading Conference.

 EditorInviteJournal Articles

  • Rodgers, E. & D’Agostino, J. (2013). Meeting the twin challenges of sustaining and scaling-up. Journal of Reading Recovery, 13 (2), 32-36
  • Rodgers, E. & D’Agostino, J. (2012). Scaling up Reading Recovery: Two years of remarkable outcomes. Journal of Reading Recovery, 12 (2), 37-40.
  • Rodgers, E. & D’Agostino, J. (2012). Funds to support scale-up of Descubriendo la lectura.Journal of Reading Recovery, 12 (1), 39-­42.
  • Rodgers, E. & D’Agostino, J. (2011). Scaling up Reading Recovery: Poised to start year 2.Journal of Reading Recovery, 11, 39-­42.

 Books

  •  Rodgers, A. & Rodgers, E. (2007). The Effective Literacy Coach. NY: Teachers College Press.

 Edited books

  • Rodgers, A. & Rodgers E. (2004). Strategies for Scaffolding Literacy Instruction in K-­4 Classrooms. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Rodgers, E. & Pinnell, G. (2002). Learning from teaching in literacy education: New perspectives on professional development. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

 Chapters in edited books

  • Harmey, S. & Rodgers, E. (Forthcoming). Turning around the progress of young struggling writers: Key finding from recent research. In E. Ortlieb, E.H. Cheek, & W. Verlaan (Eds.), Literacy Research, Practice, and Evaluation (Volume 7): Writing Instruction to Support Literacy Success. Emerald Press.
  • Rodgers, A., & Rodgers, E. (2013). Effective literacy coaching for teachers: Context and practice. In D. Strickland, D. Quatroche, & S. Wepner (Eds.), The administration and supervision of reading programs. (5th Ed). New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Rodgers, E. (2012). Using systematic observation to assess early literacy development and plan instruction. In E. Ortlieb and E. Cheek, (Eds). Literacy research, practice and evaluation; Vol 1, Emerald Press.
  • Rodgers, E., Pinnell, G. & McGee L. (2010). Reading Recovery. In Thomas Hunt, James Carper, Thomas Lasley, Daniel Raisch, C. (Eds). Encyclopedia of Educational Reform and Dissent. Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.
  • Rodgers, E. (2008). Write now: Don’t wait to teach struggling readers about writing. In G.S. Pinnell and P. Scharer (Eds). Guiding K-­3 writers to independence: The new essentials. (pp.193-­208). Scholastic.
  • Rodgers, A. & Rodgers, E. (2007). Preparing for diversity: Professional development for today's teachers. In M. Schulz & B. Honchell (Eds.). Literacy for diverse learners. Christopher Gordon.
  • Pinnell, G.S. & Rodgers, E.M. (2004). Reflective inquiry as a tool for professional development. In D. Strickland & M. Kamil (Eds). Improving reading achievement through professional development (pp169-­193). Christopher-­Gordon Publishers.
  • Rodgers, E. & Rodgers, A. (2004). The role of scaffolding in teaching. In A. Rodgers & E. Rodgers (Eds.) Strategies for scaffolding literacy Instruction in K-­4 classrooms. (pp. 1-­10). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Pinnell, G.S. & Rodgers, E. (2002). Making decisions as professional developers. In E. Rodgers & G. Pinnell (Eds.). Learning from teaching in literacy education: New perspectives on professional development (pp.173-­190).  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Rodgers, E. (2002). Lessons from a successful reform initiative. In E. Rodgers & G. Pinnell (Eds.). Learning from teaching in literacy education: New perspectives on professional development. (pp.158-­172).  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Rodgers, E., Fullerton, S. & DeFord, D. (2002). Making a difference with professional development. In E. Rodgers & G. Pinnell (Eds.). Learning from teaching in literacy education: New perspectives on professional development.  (pp.52-­62). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Rodgers, E. M.& Pinnell, G.  (2002). Professional development scenarios: What is and might be. In  E. Rodgers & G. Pinnell (Eds.) Learning from teaching in literacy education: New perspectives on professional development. (pp.1-­8). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

 Bulletins and Technical Reports

  • Rodgers, E. & Bwire, D. (2015). Reading Recovery in Ohio: 2009–2014 State Report. Columbus, OH: The Ohio State University
  • Rodgers, E.M. (2009). Reading Recovery in Ohio: Executive Summary, 2008-­2009. Columbus:  The Ohio State University.
  • Rodgers, E. (2009). Reading Recovery in Ohio. 2007-­2008 State Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E.M. (2008). Reading Recovery in Ohio: Executive Summary, 2007-­2008. Columbus: The Ohio State University.
  • Rodgers, E. & Brymer-­Bashore, J. (2008). Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la  LecturaNational Report, 2006 -­ 2007. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E. (2008). Reading Recovery in Ohio. 2006-­2007 State Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E.M. (2008). Reading Recovery in Ohio: Executive Summary, 2007-­2008. Columbus: The Ohio State University.
  • Rodgers, E. & Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. (2006). Reading Recovery in Ohio. 2005-­2006 Final ProjectReport. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X., Rodgers, E. (2006). Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la LecturaNational Report, 2004 -­  2005. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E. & Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. (2005). Reading Recovery in Ohio. 2004-­2005 Final Project Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X., Rodgers, E. & Schulz, M. (2005). Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la Lectura National Report, 2003 -­  2004. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E., Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. & Schulz, M. (2005). Reading Recovery in Ohio: 2003-­2004 State Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X., Rodgers, E., (2004). Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la Lectura National Report, 2002 -­  2003. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E., Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. (2004). Reading Recovery in Ohio: 2002-­2003 State Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X., Rodgers, E., & Fullerton, S.K. (2003). Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la Lectura National Report, 2001 -­ 2002. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.
  • Rodgers, E., Gómez-­Bellengé, F. X. & Fullerton, S.K. (2003). Reading Recovery in Ohio: 2001-­2002 State Report. Columbus, OH: National Data Evaluation Center.