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Andrew Hanks

Assistant Professor, Department of Human Sciences

Program Area: Consumer Sciences

(614) 688-1787
hanks.46@osu.edu

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Biography

Andrew (Drew) Hanks, PhD, is assistant professor of Consumer Sciences in the Department of Human Sciences. He joined the faculty in the College of Education and Human Ecology in 2014.

As a behavioral economist, Dr. Hanks extends traditional economic models of decision making to capture psychological aspects of consumer choice. His primary research interests are in consumer food choice and intake and the economic and psychological factors that influence these decisions. He also is interested in the differences in food choice and intake that arise based on cultural heritage and social background. His research has led him to conduct studies in a variety of settings including restaurants, grocery stores and homes.

In 2011, Dr. Hanks received an MS in Statistics and PhD in Economics from Washington State University. From 2011 to 2014, he was the research director for the Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs and lead analyst for the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. In this capacity he published numerous articles on the behavioral economics of food choice and presented his research to audiences such as food service managers, academics, and government officials.

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Education

  • PhD, Economics, Washington State University, 2011
  • MS, Statistics, Washington State University, 2011
  • BS, Economics and History, Brigham Young University, 2006

Research Summary

Hanks' research has focused primarily on the behavioral determinants of food selection and intake. He has conducted studies in restaurants, homes, school lunchrooms and stores.

He is currently working on research dealing with the economic burden of poor nutrition, consumer responses to taxes and subsidies on food, how eating environments influence food choice and the impact of information on consumer decisions.

Given the interdisciplinary nature of his research, Hanks also has conducted research uncovering some of the challenges facing interdisciplinary researchers.

Additional information about Hanks' research can be found at the Social Science Research Network and Research Gate.

Selected Grants

  • Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs Amendment. ($900,000). United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, 2013-2015.
  • The Gateway to a More Nutrition Lunch: Milk and Dairy Consumption in School Lunchrooms. ($110,000). United States Department of Agriculture, Smith-Lever-Hatch Grant Program, 2012-2015.
  • Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs Amendment. ($870,000). United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, 2012-2015.
  • Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs Amendment. ($550,000). United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, 2011-2015.

Selected Presentations

  1. “Perceived Choice: Using Choice Architecture to Improve Food Choice.” Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Annual Meeting, July 2014.
  2. “The Case of Unintended Consequences: Why Understanding Consumer Behavior is Essential for Policy Makers”. Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics, July 2014.
  3. “Evaluating Fat Taxes and Healthy Subsidies in a Field Experiment.” Obesity Week [poster], Nov 2013; Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Annual Conference [poster], Aug 2013; NE Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, June 2013.
  4. “From Coke to Coors: Unintended Consequences of a Fat Tax.” Obesity Week [poster], Nov 2013; Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Annual Conference [poster], Aug 2013, Association for Consumer Research Annual Meeting, Oct 2012.
  5. “Healthy Convenience: Nudging Students Toward Healthier Choices in the Lunchroom” Environmental Design Research Association: Distinguished Paper Award, May 2013.
  6. “Competing Incentives in School Lunchrooms.” Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Annual Meeting, Aug 2013.

Selected Publications

  1. Hanks, Andrew S, David R. Just, and Adam Brumberg (2016). “Marketing Vegetables in Elementary School Cafeterias to Increase Updake.” Pediatrics. 2016;138(2):e20151720. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2015-1720.
  2. Just, David R. and Andrew S. Hanks (2015). “The Hidden Costs of Regulation: Emotional Responses to Command and Control.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics. 97(5): 1385-1399.
  3. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2014). “Chocolate Milk Consequences: A Pilot Study Evaluating the Consequences of Banning Chocolate Milk in School Cafeterias.” PLoS One 9(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal/pone/0091022.
  4. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2014). “Reliability and Accuracy of Real-Time Visualization Techniques for Measuring School Cafeteria Tray Waste: Validating the Quarter-Waste Method.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 114(3):470-474.
  5. Hanks, Andrew S. and Kevin M. Kniffin (2014): “Early Career PhD Salaries. The Industry Premium and Interdisciplinary Debate.” Applied Economics Letters 21(18):1277-1282.
  6. Pope, Elizabeth, Andrew S. Hanks, David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2014). “New Year’s Res-Illusions: Non-Compensating Cycles of Holiday Grocery Shopping. PLoS One, in press.
  7. Wansink, Brian and Andrew S. Hanks (2014). “Calorie Reductions and Within-meal Calorie Compensation in Children’s Meal Combos.” Obesity 22(3): 630-632.
  8. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2013). “Pre-Ordering School Lunches Encourages Better Food Choices by Children.” JAMA Pediatrics 167(7): 673-674.
  9. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2013). “Smarter Lunchrooms: Libertarian Paternalism Can Address New School Lunchroom Guidelines and Obesity.” Journal of Pediatrics 162 (4): 867-869.
  10. Wansink, Brian and Andrew S. Hanks (2013). “Slim by Design: Serving Healthy Foods First in Buffet Lines Improves Overall Meal Selection.” PLoS ONE 8(10). Doi: 10.1371/journal/pone.007055.
  11. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, Laura E. Smith, and Brian Wansink (2012). “Healthy Convenience: Nudging Students Toward Healthier Choices in the Lunchroom.” Journal of Public Health 34(3): 370-376.
  12. Hanks, Andrew S., David R. Just, and Brian Wansink (2012). “Trigger Foods: The Influence of ‘Irrelevant’ Alternatives in School Lunchrooms.” Agricultural and Resource Economics Review 41(1): 114-123.
  13. Tasnádi, Attila T., Trenton G. Smith, and Andrew S. Hanks (2012). “Quality Uncertainty as Resolution of the Bertrand Paradox.” Pacific Economic Review 15(5): 687-692.