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David Haury

Faculty Emeritus, Department of Teaching and Learning

Program Area: Science, STEM

(614) 292-2526
haury.2@osu.edu

Biography

David Haury is an Professor of science education in the Department of Teaching and Learning. He teaches doctoral seminars focusing on issues and research in science, mathematics, and technology education, and he offers courses on instructional methods in science for prospective and practicing teachers. Having cultivated his interests in the natural environment and evolution since childhood, David's professional activities generally relate to teaching and learning about evolution, the nature of science, and their connections to environmental issues.

In the area of evolution education, David is particularly interested in understanding public resistance to evolutionary theory and the ongoing struggle between evolutionary thinking and diverse worldviews. Much of the struggle, in David's view, has to do with limited understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge, so he is also interested in promoting evidence-based reasoning and inquiry-oriented learning at all academic levels. Being a naturalist, David is also interested in how we can apply scientific knowledge to reduce destructive human impacts on nature while fostering educational practices that promote sustainability of natural ecosystems. In that regard, he is collaborating with a group of science educators worldwide to develop an educational response to the major environmental issue of our time, global climate change.

Whether designing curricula, developing instructional strategies, or studying student understanding, David tends to look beyond traditional concerns about content standards and assessment practices to focus on who we are as evolutionary beings and how we might foster more reflective consideration of the effects of our collective actions on natural support systems.

Education

  • PhD, Science Education, Graduate School, The University of Washington, 1983.
    • Dissertation: Science locus of control orientations and the attitudes expressed by elementary teacher interns toward science teaching. Advisor: Dr. Roger G. Olstad.
  • MA, Biology, Graduate School, University of Oregon, 1978.
    • Thesis: Hemoglobin transformation during metamorphosis in anurans. Advisor: Dr. Robert Terwilliger.
  • BA, Biology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Oregon, 1974. (Program included study at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology; Oregon Teaching Certificates awarded for secondary biology and integrated science.)

Experience

  • Associate Professor of Science Education, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1989-1991.
  • Assistant Professor of Science Education, Tufts University, 1984-1989.
  • Assistant Professor of Biology, Judson Baptist College, 1982-84.
  • Science Teacher, Grant High School, Mt. Gambier, South Australia, 1974-77.
  • Reviewer, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1998-present.
  • Executive Editor (1991-2003) for over one hundred publications developed and published by the ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.
  • Executive Secretary, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, 2000-2002.
  • Reviewer, Science Education, 1994-1999.
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1992-1995.

Honors

  • Service Award presented by the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science for contributions as the founding editor of the Journal of Science Teacher Education during the years of 1989-1993.
  • Distinguished Graduate Award, College of Education, University of Washington, June 1994.
  • Commendation as one of The Ohio State University's top 25 principal investigators in research funding, 1998.

Selected Grants

  • Director and Principal Investigator, Ohio Science Institutes for Middle Grades. Funded by the Ohio Department of Education; $600,000; 2004.
  • Principal Investigator (one of eight; Lead PI was Douglas T. Owens), The Ohio State University Science and Mathematics Summer Institutes for Instructional Change. Funded by the Ohio Board of Regents; $246,330; 2004-2005.
  • Director and Principal Investigator, ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education. Funded by the Office for Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education; $2,376,607; 1999-2003.
  • Director and Principal Investigator, EarthVision 2000. Funded by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency; $999,997; 1998-1999.
  • Principal Investigator (one of four), Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education. Funded by the Office for Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education; $38,654,670; 1997-2005.
  • Director and Principal Investigator, ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education. Funded by the Office for Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education; $2,125,721; 1993-1998.
  • Principal Investigator (one of three) and Associate Director. Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education. Funded by the Office for Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education; $22,908,840; 1992-1997.
  • Director and Principal Investigator, ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education. Funded by the Office for Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education; $462,216; 1992-1993.
  • Director and Principal Investigator, Science Education Programs and Leadership (SEPAL): Lowell, Center for Field Services and Studies, University of Lowell, Lowell, MA, Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Eisenhower Program for the Improvement of Mathematics and Science Education, and designated an exemplary program by the Massachusetts Board of Regents.1988-1991.

Selected Publications

  • Haury, D. L. (2007). Examining the evolutionary heritage of humans. In L. Jones & M. J. Reiss (Eds.), Teaching about scientific origins: Taking account of creationism, New York: Peter Lang.
  • Haury, D. L. (2005). Education for environmental sustainability. In J. Hassard, The art of science teaching: Inquiry and innovation in middle school and high school (pp. 4333-435), New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Haury, D. L. (2004). Assessing the educational dimension of environmental education resources provided by non-formal groups. In: M. Mappin & E. A. Johnson (Eds.). Environmental education or advocacy: Perspectives of ecology and education in environmental education. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Haury, D. L. (2002). Learning science through design (ERIC Digest). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.
  • Haury, D. L. (2001). Teaching science through inquiry with archived data (ERIC Digest). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.
  • Haury, D. L. (1997). Teaching Evolution in School Science Classes. In National Library of Education. Striving for excellence: The national education goals, Volume III. Washington, DC: GPO (pp. 129-130).
  • Haury, D. L. (1993). Teaching science through inquiry. In Striving for excellence: The national education goals, Volume II. Washington, DC: Educational Resources Information Center.)
  • Haury, D. L., & Rillero, P. (1992). Hands-on approaches to science teaching. Questions and answers from the field and research. Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.
  • Haury, D. L. (1989). The contributions of science locus of control orientation to expressions of attitude toward science teaching. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26, 503-517.
  • Haury, D. L. (1988). Evidence that science locus of control orientation can be modified through instruction. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 25, 233-246.